Category: Articles

How Missing Teeth Affect Your Health

How Missing Teeth Affect Your Health You might think that a missing tooth is unsightly, and you are right. But do you know that missing teeth can affect not only your dental health, but also your overall health? Dr. Elmira Abraamyan runs her own dental practice, Sunrise Family Dentistry, in Roseville, California.  Here, she talks about how missing teeth not only affect the aesthetics of your smile, but your dental and overall health as well. Effect on overall health. As is known to all, because your ability to chew decreases with missing teeth, it directly affects your overall medical health. Chewing food is the beginning of the digestive process. If you lose a tooth, then you can’t chew the food properly before swallowing, the stomach and intestines will work harder to absorb nutrients. That means you absorb fewer nutrients and are less healthy. It shows that your missing teeth affect your overall health.

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We Treat You Like Family with Dental Implant Procedures

Tooth Implant Roseville There is good news for Roseville, California residents who are missing one of more teeth. The ability to eat, speak and smile with confidence is available through Sunrise Family Dentistry. As our name implies, a visit to our Roseville office is like a trip to see family. We understand the importance of being able to express insecurities caused by a less than perfect smile. That is why we offer the latest in prosthetic and cosmetic dentistry. Dental implants involve placing an artificial root into the jaw that holds replacement teeth. With dental implants, our respected and skilled staff will give you natural-looking teeth. The right specialist coupled with diligent oral hygiene care helps dental implants last a lifetime.

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I have a terrible fear of going to the dentist yet I know I need to. What should I do?

I have a terrible fear of going to the dentist yet I know I need to. What should I do? Dental anxiety is a common problem that many people face when dealing with an oral health issue. However, it is essential for you to overcome your fear so that you can receive proper dental care. Fortunately, dental professionals are familiar with the concerns of their patients, and a quality dentist will go out of their way to make you feel comfortable during your visit. If you know that a dental appointment is in your near future and you are feeling scared, then here are a few of the best ways to alleviate your anxiety. Identify Your Fear A fear of going to the dentist can be caused by many different factors. Understand the underlying cause can help you to overcome your fear. Have you had a bad experience with a dentist before? Try remembering that this time will be different. If you are afraid of enduring a long and painful procedure, then talk to your dentist about the pain relief options that are available or discuss breaking up your procedure into smaller appointments. Once you know what is causing your fear, then you can begin to take the appropriate steps to correct the concern.

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Common Questions About Sedation Dentistry

Common Questions About Sedation Dentistry Sunrise Family Dentistry provides dental services for the entire family. It is located in Roseville, California. Our goal is to provide you affordable, pain free and quality dental care, whether you are visiting us for a twice-yearly checkup, have a toothache, need your teeth whitened or are experiencing a problem of a more serious nature. Many people avoid getting regular dental checkups because they believe the treatment is unpleasant and painful. In reality, if you visit a dentist regularly for examinations, many serious and costly problems are avoided. We utilize different methods to sedate the patient. This ensures that your visit is comfortable instead of being anxiety provoking. It is our desire to administer virtually pain-free services to you and your family members. This is why we use various forms of sedation in our practice. Here are some questions that may concern you.

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Digital X-Rays

Digital X-Rays

Digital x-rays are a more streamlined way of taking dental radiographs. Like traditional x-rays, digital versions provide an in-depth view of the structures of the mouth, helping dentists detect complications and develop effective modes of treatment. Digital x-rays are capable of revealing hidden caries, bone erosion, and even tooth decay hiding beneath restorations. Requiring less radiation and no film to process, digital x-rays have become the standard for oral imaging. These systems produce instant digital images that can easily be enhanced and enlarged for a more accurate diagnosis. The images are captured, stored, and even transmitted via in-office computers. In fact, dentists can easily print or email copies of x-rays in just seconds. Dental x-rays make for a better and more efficient patient experience. Office visits are faster, patients are exposed to less radiation, and radiographs can be sent to a specialist for review in a fraction of the time necessary for traditional film x-rays.

Dental X-Rays

For years, dental x-rays have been used to diagnose oral health complications and detect decaying or damaged teeth. X-rays provide a unique view of the mouth that isn’t possible with a visual exam alone. When x-rays are taken, the teeth and bones absorb the majority of the ray, making them highly visible on film or on a screen. Nearly all new dental patients are x-rayed, although you may instead request that previous x-rays be transferred from another dental provider to your new dentist. By comparing your x-rays with your full mouth examination and dental history, your dentist can prescribe effective treatment and recommend a plan for preventative care.

Did you know...

that dental x-rays deliver very low levels of radiation and are considered completely safe? In fact, x-rays are even considered safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding so long as a leaded apron and collar are used to protect your body from exposure. If you are pregnant or think you may be, tell your dentist so proper precautions can be taken.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I get dental x-rays?

Yes. Dental x-rays are capable of identifying tooth decay and damage beneath the surface of the teeth where caries are less visible during an examination. Furthermore, x-rays provide a reference point for the progression of decay in your mouth over time. You should have x-rays taken on a regular basis, but especially if you are experiencing oral health complications or are planning to undergo a dental procedure, such as a root canal.

What should I expect when I get dental x-rays?

Getting traditional dental x-rays can take several minutes. A thick paper tab is placed into the mouth, which you will be asked to bite down on. Most patients find that dental x-rays are completely painless and do not inflict any level of discomfort. In some cases, dentists intraoral x-rays, as well as extra-oral x-rays that snap images of the face, jaw and skull. Extra-oral x-rays are typically used to identify impacted teeth, such as wisdom teeth.

What happens after my dentist has taken x-rays?

Your x-rays will be saved either on film or digitally. In the future, your dentist may request additional dental x-rays every few years to monitor the health of your teeth, gums and jaw over time. If you are considered to be high risk for oral disease or are exhibiting symptoms of complications, your dentist may prefer to take x-rays more frequently.

Dentistry Post-Op Questions

Dentistry Post-Op Questions

If you are undergoing a dental procedure or operation, you will be given a set of post-operative instructions to abide by in the hours, days, and weeks after your treatment. Following these instructions is essential to preventing infections in surgical sites, protecting restorations, and minimizing the possibility of experiencing complications. Post-operative instructions vary from procedure to procedure, but you are still sure to have some questions regarding care. Your [city] dentist will be available to answer those questions and respond to any concerns you may have.

Post-Op Questions

Try to anticipate some of the questions you may have about your post-operative care and ask them prior to your treatment.

Some of the most common post-op questions include:
  • How should I manage pain following my procedure?
  • How long should I experience discomfort?
  • Do I need to follow any special dietary guidelines?
  • Is it safe for me to drink through a straw?
  • Will I be able to drive myself home after my procedure?
  • Will I need to take an antibiotic?
  • Will I need to return to your office for a follow-up appointment?
  • When will my permanent restorations be ready?
  • How do I care for my removable prosthesis?

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I talk with my dentist about the questions I have regarding my post-operative care?

Yes. Your post-operative care is contingent on you understanding everything about the recovery process and your responsibilities in caring for your surgical site.

What should I expect when I speak with my dentist?

Your dentist should allocate enough time in your consultation and pre-operative exam to listen to your concerns and answer any questions you may have. You should also be provided a phone number that you can call following your procedure to discuss any questions that may come up at that time.

Is there anything I can do to make the process easier?

Yes. Begin thinking of any questions you may have about your post-operative care, and begin writing them down. You’ll be ready to ask all of your questions when the opportunity arises without missing any important details.

Fluoride and Decay Prevention

Fluoride and Decay Prevention

Fluoride is a naturally occurring element that has been shown to help strengthen teeth in children and also prevent decay in people of all ages. Topical fluoride, in particular is helpful for promoting oral health. The American Dental Association has publicly endorsed the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries, as has the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association.

Did you know...

that you might be drinking fluoride every day without knowing it? Many communities add fluoride to the public water supply in an effort to promote better dental health. You can find out if there is fluoride in your tap water by contacting your local water utility. Keep in mind that if your primary source of drinking water is bottled, you may not be getting fluoride. You can contact your bottle water company or manufacturer to find out if fluoride is in your water. If not, speak with your dentist about getting professional fluoride treatments.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need fluoride treatments?

You may need fluoride treatments if your drinking water is not fluoridated or if you are experiencing certain symptoms, such as receding gums. Fluoride treatments can also provide oral support and prevent decay if you wear orthodontic braces or are taking medications that cause dry mouth.

What should I expect during fluoride treatments?

Fluoride treatments are painless and can be administered in your dentist’s office at your twice-yearly check-ups and cleanings. Your dentist will distribute fluoridated gel, foam or varnish into a tray and place it over your teeth. The treatment takes only a few minutes and is only required between one and four times per year.

Is there anything I can do to supplement my fluoride treatments?

Yes. The ADA recommends supplementing your fluoridated drinking water or fluoride treatments with a fluoridated toothpaste.

How to Floss Your Teeth

How to Floss Your Teeth

Flossing is an important part of an oral hygiene routine, but research suggests that fewer than half of Americans do so daily. Flossing is simple and only takes an extra couple of minutes per day. Developing a healthy habit of flossing can prevent tooth decay and gum disease, and it may allow you to keep more of your natural teeth as you age. So what is the most effective means of flossing?

  1. Pull the floss taught and slide it between two teeth.
  2. Pull against the side of one tooth, creating a “C-shape” and sliding upwards to remove plaque build-up.
  3. Pull against the opposite tooth edge using the same technique.
  4. Repeat this process for each tooth until all inner surfaces have been flossed.
  5. Don’t forget to floss the backs of your molars!

Need some extra tips?

The American Dental Association recommends using a strand of floss approximately 18 inches in length. It is important to only use clean floss as you move between the teeth. One of the easiest ways of doing this is by looping each end of the floss around your fingers and beginning to floss with the area closest to one end. If you have never flossed, be sure to ask your dentist for a quick in-person tutorial at your next check-up.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I be flossing?

Yes. The ADA recommends that everyone floss in order to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Even if you have restorations, such as crowns or veneers, good oral hygiene is essential for prolonging their use and maintaining your oral health.

What types of results should I get from flossing?

You may not experience immediate results from flossing, but over time, your habit will pay off. Flossing can prevent tooth decay, gum disease and tooth loss – all of which can be highly inconvenient and expensive to treat. A piece of floss that costs just pennies could save you thousands of dollars later on.

Is there anything else I should be doing in addition to flossing?

Yes. In addition to flossing, you should be adopting proper brushing techniques and visiting your dentist at least twice per year for examinations and professional dental cleanings.

Electric Brush vs. Manual Brushes

Electric Brush vs. Manual Brushes

Preventative dentistry is about more than just visiting your dentist twice yearly for an exam and thorough cleaning. In fact, the majority of your preventative care is done at-home as a part of your normal hygienic routine. Many residents use manual toothbrushes to remove debris and plaque from their teeth. However, electric brushes have become widely popular in recent years, leaving some to wonder whether one type is better than the other.

Did you know...

the American Dental Association does not lean toward one type of brush over the other? It does, however, acknowledge that people with upper body mobility restrictions may better benefit from an electric toothbrush instead of a manual brush. Regardless of which type you decide is right for you, the ADA recommends that all brushes be soft-bristled so as to avoid abrasions that can lead to decay and receding gum lines.

Frequently Asked Questions

Which toothbrush should I be using?

You can effectively brush your teeth with either a manual toothbrush or an electric one. However, the rapid movements of motorized versions may be more effective at removing plaque from the teeth and gum line. If you have questions about which toothbrush is best for you, speak with your dentist about it at your next visit. He or she may recommend an electric brush with an oscillating head or a brush that includes a timer to let you know how long to brush.

What types of results should I be getting from by toothbrush?

Regardless of whether you choose an electric brush or a manual brush, it should be easy for you to maneuver in your mouth and behind your back teeth. If the head is too big, it may not be effectively removing plaque from your teeth.

My electric toothbrush was expensive. Do I need to change it as often as a manual brush?

Yes. Your toothbrush should be replaced at least once every three to four months or whenever you notice fraying. However, most electric toothbrushes come with interchangeable heads. In other words, you won’t need to replace the entire device – only the brush itself.