Category: Preventative Care

To Mouthwash or Not to Mouthwash?

mouthwash-or-not-to-mouthwash Many people use mouthwash as part of their regular dental hygiene care. Others avoid using mouthwash, feeling it is unnecessary or too harsh for the mouth tissues. Mouthwash can be an effective dental aid when used appropriately. Ask your dentist. Although it seems logical that most dentists would recommend the use of mouthwash to their patients, there may be some dental practitioners who advise against using it. One reason is because mouthwash may be unnecessary for children, for example, who are just learning to brush and floss, and may misuse mouthwash. Another reason to avoid mouthwash is for patients who have special mouth conditions that mouthwash could irritate. A dentist will let you know if you can safely use mouthwash as part of your dental hygiene program. 

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Tricks for Teaching Your Kids Better Dental Habits

tricks-for-teach-your-kids-dental-brushing-habbits-roseville-ca-dentist While toddlers often love brushing their teeth to be like older siblings or parents, school-age kids may need encouragement to develop healthy dental habits. Fortunately, there are several things parents can do to teach children about effective dental hygiene. Use fun dental products. Dentists often hand out free fun toothbrushes and dental supplies for kids. You can also buy themed toothbrushes, toothpaste, mouthwash, and dental floss. Let your children choose favorite characters and colors to support their interest in dental hygiene products, and they're likely to spend more time using them consistently.

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Dental pulp diseases: The basics

dental-pulp-disease-roseville-ca Not paying proper attention to proper oral hygiene leads to cavities, and if those cavities go untreated, the middle of your tooth known as the pulp can become infected. Pulp disease is painful and dangerous, and it requires treatment. It can easily turn into an oral infection. A sign of pulp disease is pain when eating sweet, hot or cold foods and drinks. Pulp disease can be reversible or irreversible. Reversible pulp disease Inflamed tooth pulp can become infected and become abscessed. These infections are usually treated with antibiotics and fillings. A cracked or broken tooth can also result infections or abscesses. Irreversible pulp disease This is very painful pulp inflammation, and there's no cure for it. It's dangerous because if the condition goes untreated, it can spread to the gums and other tissues. It's ordinarily treated with a root canal because the tooth's root becomes infected. The pulp of the tooth is removed and replaced. If the root canal can't be performed, the tooth itself has to be removed. 

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Dental Work: Should You Get a Second Opinion?

second-opinion-roseville-dentist If you have been recently diagnosed with an array of dental conditions, it is recommended to obtain a second opinion. It will not only confirm or contradict the opinion of the treating dentist, but it will also give you a peace of mind about the proposed course of treatment. It is especially true if a substantial cost is involved along with any serious existing dental discrepancies you may have such as multiple missing teeth or oral disease. A second opinion should be sought after if: • You do not feel comfortable with the treatment plan presented by your dentist • You do not have good rapport with your dental provider • Your insurance does not cover the procedures and you will have to pay out-of-pocket • Serious medical conditions are present and may require the involvement of a specialist • You have had dental work done, but it is not satisfactory

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American’s Are Not Receiving Routine Preventative Dental Care

americans-not-receiving-preventative-dental-care-roseville-ca The American way is to get a new one when the old one breaks. However, this does not work well when it comes to teeth. The goal is to keep the originals intact for life. Sure, there are partials, bridges, dentures and even implants that are workable solutions for millions of Americans who have lost some or all of their teeth, but nothing beats the real thing. Preventative maintenance is a given for the nation's 253 million cars, and it should also be a given for the nation's overall oral health. In 2007 a 12-year-old child died from complications of a tooth abscess. A case history report in 2012 shows how an 11-year-old child almost died from complications due to an abscessed molar that spread an infection to his brain. Issues like these can be prevented with routine preventative dental care. Village death records toward the end of the bubonic plague indicate higher numbers of death caused by tooth abscesses than the plague. In America the number should be zero considering the ability and resources that modern dentistry has to treat such infections.

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Study Finds Link Between Gum Disease and Impotence

link-between-impotence-and-oral-health If you are a man interested in maintaining a healthy sex life, or a woman who wants her man to continue to be sexually vibrant, it's important to take good care of your teeth and in particular, the health of your gums. A study published in the Journal of Sexual Health reveals that researchers have discovered a direct link between gum disease and erectile dysfunction, also known as impotence. Scientists at Turkey's University of Malatya examined a group of 160 men who were between the ages of 30 and 40 years old. Fifty percent of this group was experiencing impotence to some degree. And 53 percent of the men in this group also had gums that were infected or inflamed. Researchers concluded that men who had periodontal disease were almost 4 percent more likely to be experiencing problems keeping an erection during sexual activity than those men whose gums were in a healthy state. 

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Tooth Loss Linked to Higher Risk for Heart Disease

tooth-loss-linked-to-higher-risk-of-heart-disease Losing teeth is not only bad for your self esteem but has also been linked to heart disease. The heart disease risk factors are obesity, diabetes, smoking and high blood pressure. In a recent study, 16,000 people were analyzed to determine the association of tooth loss and heart disease. The population being derived from 39 countries provided information regarding the teeth they had remaining, and how frequent they experienced bleeding gums. Up to 40% of the sample population had less than 15 teeth while 16 % had no teeth, and 25% reported of bleeding gums. For every individual who reported a decrease in their teeth, it was noted that they had high levels of a harmful enzyme linked to hardening and inflammation of the arteries. It was also found that fewer teeth also led to an increase in blood pressure, blood sugar, bad cholesterol levels and waist size. Individuals with few teeth were found to have a high risk of diabetes with an 11 percent increase in the risk for every decrease in the teeth. Former or current smokers were also found to experience tooth loss which consequently increased the risk of a heart attack. Bleeding gums were also linked to high blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels.

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How to Prevent Teeth Grinding

how-to-prevent-teeth-grinding Different people deal with stress and anxiety in different ways. One common response to stress that is often unconscious is bruxism, also known as teeth grinding. Experienced by somewhere between half and 96 percent of the adult population, teeth grinding isn't always a serious habit, but if left unnoticed, it can have grave consequences. These consequences include the wearing down of enamel and eventual loss of teeth altogether, and painful disorders, such as TMJ. More common and less serious symptoms include facial pain and jaw clicking-- although the latter could be considered more serious if the jaw joint were to become arthritic.

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1 in 5 Americans Has Untreated Cavities

1in5-americans-has-untreated-cavities-roseville-ca Most people realize that cavities are unhealthy, but many do not understand just how prevalent of a problem tooth decay actually is. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now reports that as many as 19 percent of children and 26 percent of adults have untreated cavities. When left untreated, tooth decay can cause a variety of aesthetic and medical issues that will require comprehensive treatments. These are just some of the reasons that everyone should know about the importance of regular dental treatments and how important annual appointments are when it comes to finding and treating cavities. The easiest way to describe a cavity is a hole in one's tooth. These will develop in a number of stages beginning with harmful bacteria being left in the mouth. Certain substances such as sugar will cling to teeth and gums after being ingested. When it is not removed by brushing or flossing, then these different substances will develop into harmful bacteria. In turn, this bacterium will eat away at the outer layer of enamel on the teeth. Cavities occur when the damage has penetrated the outer layer of the teeth, but there are quite a few different types of damage that can take place with tooth decay. 

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Dentists Play Key Role In Detecting Oral Cancer

dentists-play-a-key-role-in-detecting-oral-cancer-roseville-ca According to the National Institute Of Dental And Cranofacial Research, oral cancer makes up about two percent of the cancers that are diagnosed each year. Approximately 34,000 people are diagnosed each year. It is also estimated that 7,900 people die each year from oral cancer. The good news is that early detection helps save lives. If oral cancer is diagnosed before it spreads to other parts of the body, then a person has a 83 percent chance of surviving. There are several ways oral cancer can be treated if it is caught early including surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

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